This is the "About IF & Citation Analysis" page of the "Measuring Your Impact: Impact Factor, Citation Analysis, and other Metrics" guide.
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Measuring Your Impact: Impact Factor, Citation Analysis, and other Metrics  

Overview of h-index, Eigenfactor, Impact Factor (IF), Journal Citation Reports, Citation Analysis, and other tools.
Last Updated: Sep 25, 2014 URL: http://researchguides.uic.edu/if Print Guide RSS Updates

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About Citation Analysis

Citation Analysis - What is it?

The process whereby the impact or "quality" of an article is assessed by counting the number of times other authors mention it in their work.

Citation Analysis - Why use it?

To find out how much impact a particular article or author has had, by showing which other authors cited the work within their own papers.  H-Index is one specific method utilizing citation analysis to determine an individuals impact.

 

About Journal Impact

Impact Factor - What is it?; Why use it?

The impact factor (IF) is a measure of the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year. It is used to measure the importance or rank of a journal by calculating the times it's articles are cited.

How Impact Factor is Calculated?

The calculation is based on a two-year period and involves dividing the number of times articles were cited by the number of articles that are citable.

—Calculation of 2010 IF of a journal:

¢A = the number of times articles published in 2008 and 2009 were cited by indexed journals during 2010.
¢B = the total number of "citable items" published in 2008 and 2009.
¢
A/B = 2010 impact factor 
 
 

About the H-index

The h-index is an index to quantify an individual’s scientific research output. J.E. Hirsch - http://www.pnas.org/content/102/46/16569
The h-index is an index that attempts to measure both the scientific productivity and the apparent scientific impact of a scientist. The index is based on the set of the researcher's most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other people's publications (Wikipedia)  A scientist has index h if h of [his/her] Np papers have at least h citations each, and the other (Np − h) papers have at most h citations each.

 

Find your h-index at:

 

How to Measure your Impact PPT

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